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Jock Itch

Jock itch is an infection of the skin on the groin and upper inner thigh areas.

Signs &

Symptoms

Causes

Treatment

Questions
to Ask

Self-Care /

Prevention

•  Redness.

•  Itching.

•  Raised red rash with borders. Center areas of the rash are dry with small scales.

Jock itch is usually caused by a fungus. It can also result from garments that irritate the skin. Jock itch is more likely to occur after taking antibiotics or steroids, or in persons who have diabetes or a weakened immune system.

Over-the-counter antifungal creams treat most cases of jock itch. Stronger creams or an oral medicine can be prescribed, if needed.

01

Question

Does any liquid ooze from the rash? Or, do symptoms worsen or last longer than 2 weeks despite using self-care?

See Self-Care / Prevention

To Treat Jock Itch

•  Use over-the-counter antifungal cream, powder, or lotion for jock itch. Follow package directions.

To Prevent Jock Itch

•  Don’t wear tight, close-fitting clothing. Wear boxer shorts, not briefs. Put socks on before underwear. Fungus on the feet, such as from athlete’s foot can transfer to the groin. Change underwear often, especially after tasks that leave you hot and sweaty.

•  Bathe or shower right after a workout. Don’t use antibacterial soaps. Dry the groin area well.

•  Apply talc or other powder to the groin area to help keep it dry. If you sweat a lot or are very overweight, use a drying powder with miconazole nitrate.

•  Wash workout clothes after each wearing. Don’t store damp clothing in a locker or gym bag.

•  Sleep in the nude or in a nightshirt.

•  Don’t share towels or clothes that have come in contact with the rash.

This website is not meant to substitute for expert medical advice or treatment. Follow your doctor’s or health care provider’s advice if it differs from what is given in this guide.

 

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